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What Is Hashimoto's & Thyroid Disease?

Hashimoto’s thyroiditis (also called Hashimoto’s disease or chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis) is the most common thyroid disease in the United States. It is an inherited condition that affects over 10 million Americans. It is about seven times more common in women. Hashimoto’s disease involves the production of immune cells and autoantibodies by the body’s immune system that can damage thyroid cells and compromise their ability to make thyroid hormones. Hypothyroidism occurs if the amount of thyroid hormone produced is not enough for the body’s needs. The thyroid gland may also enlarge, forming a goiter. Hashimoto’s disease results from a problem with the immune system. When working properly, the immune system is designed to protect the body against invaders such as bacteria, viruses, and other foreign substances. The immune system of someone with Hashimoto’s thyroiditis mistakenly recognizes normal thyroid cells as foreign tissue and produces antibodies that may destroy these cells.

What Is Hashimoto's & Thyroid Disease?

Hashimoto’s thyroiditis (also called Hashimoto’s disease or chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis) is the most common thyroid disease in the United States. It is an inherited condition that affects over 10 million Americans. It is about seven times more common in women. Hashimoto’s disease involves the production of immune cells and autoantibodies by the body’s immune system that can damage thyroid cells and compromise their ability to make thyroid hormones. Hypothyroidism occurs if the amount of thyroid hormone produced is not enough for the body’s needs. The thyroid gland may also enlarge, forming a goiter. Hashimoto’s disease results from a problem with the immune system. When working properly, the immune system is designed to protect the body against invaders such as bacteria, viruses, and other foreign substances. The immune system of someone with Hashimoto’s thyroiditis mistakenly recognizes normal thyroid cells as foreign tissue and produces antibodies that may destroy these cells.

What Is Hashimoto's & Thyroid Disease?

Hashimoto’s thyroiditis (also called Hashimoto’s disease or chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis) is the most common thyroid disease in the United States. It is an inherited condition that affects over 10 million Americans. It is about seven times more common in women. Hashimoto’s disease involves the production of immune cells and autoantibodies by the body’s immune system that can damage thyroid cells and compromise their ability to make thyroid hormones. Hypothyroidism occurs if the amount of thyroid hormone produced is not enough for the body’s needs. The thyroid gland may also enlarge, forming a goiter. Hashimoto’s disease results from a problem with the immune system. When working properly, the immune system is designed to protect the body against invaders such as bacteria, viruses, and other foreign substances. The immune system of someone with Hashimoto’s thyroiditis mistakenly recognizes normal thyroid cells as foreign tissue and produces antibodies that may destroy these cells.

What Is Hashimoto's & Thyroid Disease?

Hashimoto’s thyroiditis (also called Hashimoto’s disease or chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis) is the most common thyroid disease in the United States. It is an inherited condition that affects over 10 million Americans. It is about seven times more common in women. Hashimoto’s disease involves the production of immune cells and autoantibodies by the body’s immune system that can damage thyroid cells and compromise their ability to make thyroid hormones. Hypothyroidism occurs if the amount of thyroid hormone produced is not enough for the body’s needs. The thyroid gland may also enlarge, forming a goiter. Hashimoto’s disease results from a problem with the immune system. When working properly, the immune system is designed to protect the body against invaders such as bacteria, viruses, and other foreign substances. The immune system of someone with Hashimoto’s thyroiditis mistakenly recognizes normal thyroid cells as foreign tissue and produces antibodies that may destroy these cells.

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